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Hancock County Trustees of Public Reservations Receives Additional 64 Acres for Public Benefit

ELLSWORTH: The Hancock County Trustees of Public Reservations (Trustees) are pleased to announce that Persis Ray has transferred 64 acres of land to the Trustees. The wooded land runs parallel and contiguous to the southern boundary of Woodlawn, the Trustees’ current property and main holding, in the area known as Westwood Hills.

“Mrs. Ray has given us an important resource,” remarked Terry Carlisle, president of the Trustees. Woodlawn’s executive director, Joshua Campbell Torrance says, “We are honored that she has entrusted the Trustees with the careful management of this land.”

In 1901, forward-thinking citizens on Mount Desert Island formed the Hancock County Trustees of Public Reservations (Trustees) to acquire lands for free public use. Empowered by the Maine Legislature in 1903 to own lands of “scenic beauty, historical significance, scientific study or sanitary value,” the Trustees acquired nearly 5,000 acres. In 1916, they donated their holdings to the United States, forming the core of what became Acadia National Park. The Trustees’ holdings extend beyond the confines of Acadia National Park. They have owned and maintained the Woodlawn estate, home of the famous Black House, a historic house and public park since 1929. With this recent land donation, the Trustees’ legacy of maintaining land for public benefit continues. To learn more visit: hctpr.org

 

About Hancock County Trustees of Public Reservations

In 1901, the Hancock County Trustees of Public Reservations (Trustees) formed to acquire lands for free public use. The Trustees acquired nearly 5,000 acres and in 1916, donated their holdings to the United States, forming the core of what became Acadia National Park. Beyond Acadia National Park, the Trustees have owned and made the Woodlawn estate, home of the famous Black House, available for public use and enjoyment since 1929.

 

In time, they developed Woodlawn into a widely prized and beloved cultural institution, with their efforts ongoing today. Visit hctpr.org to learn of the numerous land donations the Trustees have made over several decades – creating a lasting legacy by building a sense of place and community pride enjoyed by millions each year.

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